Posts for Latest Happenings

Meet Up and Eat Up!
Posted on July 14, 2017

Share Info on Free Summer Meals With Your Friends

Michigan.gov’s goal is to feed as many hungry children across the state of Michigan as possible, and you can help. Governor Snyder has declared July 16-22 Meet Up and Eat Up Summer Food Service Program Awareness Week.

Help us get the word out by sharing info about Meet Up and Eat Up via social media. Your friends and family will appreciate the information and meals for their children.

About the Summer Food Service Program
Meet Up and Eat Up is a way to help parents and caregivers identify places where kids 18 and younger can gather for healthy, free summer meals at hundreds of sites across Michigan. We encourage you to share our updates with your family and friends. You can find a meal site here

Water Safety Reminders
Posted on June 07, 2017

Red Nose Day at UPHP
Posted on May 25, 2017

It’s RED NOSE DAY! Today is all about having fun, raising money, and helping kids in need. The money raised will help transform the lives of children living in poverty in the US and internationally. Red Nose Day supports programs that keep kids safe, healthy, and educated. UPHP is proud to join in on the fun!

Community Immunity is an Umbrella of Protection
Posted on May 17, 2017

Think of germs as rain. Vaccination is a raincoat. Even with a raincoat on, you can still get wet. You need an umbrella, too. The umbrella is “community immunity.” Those who don’t vaccinate rely on others to share their umbrella when it rains. But we need our communities to invest in umbrellas together. Newborns rely on their parents and on their caregivers to offer protection by sharing their umbrellas.

Vaccination protects the people you care about.

There are two critical points for vaccination to create community immunity:

  1. You need to be vaccinated.
  2. The people around you need to be vaccinated.

When a person is vaccinated, they prevent disease from spreading to others in the community, including:

  • Babies who are too young to receive vaccines
  • Pregnant women
  • The elderly
  • Individuals who cannot be vaccinated for medical reasons, such as those with weakened immune systems, asthma, chronic illness, or undergoing treatment for cancer

For most vaccine-preventable diseases, when less than 90 percent of children are vaccinated in a particular community, these pockets of low vaccination create an environment where diseases can take hold and spread.

Only a very small percentage of children in the U.S. are completely unvaccinated—about 3 percent—however, they tend to group in certain communities. Parents may share false information they find online, or talk to a friend who has decided not to vaccinate their child. This misinformation can spread throughout a community and put community immunity in jeopardy.

According to Michigan Care Improvement Registry (MCIR) data from December 31, 2016, only 54% of Michigan toddlers are up to date on their vaccinations. The percent of Michigan children ages 19-35 months who are protected against the following diseases are shown below.

  • Birth Dose Hepatitis B: 79%
  • Combined 7-vaccine series (4 DTaP, 3 Polio, 1 MMR, 3 Hib, 3 HepB, 1 Varicella, 4 PCV): 74.9%
  • Combined 8-vaccine series (4 DTaP, 3 Polio, 1 MMR, 3 Hib, 3 HepB, 1 Varicella, 4 PCV, 2 HepA): 54.3%
  • 2+ Hep A: 56%
  • 4+ DTap: 78.4%
  • 4+ PCV: 84.9%
  • Up-to-Date Rotavirus (8-24 months): 71.2%

Vaccine Abbreviations

VACCINATIONS DISEASES
DTaP Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis (Whooping Cough)
Hep A Hepatitis A
Hep B Hepatitis B
Hib Haemophilus influenzae type b
MMR Measles, Mumps, Rubella
PCV Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine
Rota Rotavirus
Var Varicella (Chickenpox)

While progress has been made, there’s still room for improvement in Michigan communities.

In recent years, Michigan had some of the lowest vaccination rates in the country. Efforts have been made to improve vaccination coverage and as a result, more people are getting vaccinated. To continue to protect as many people as possible, more can still be done to achieve community immunity across our state.

  • Michigan’s childhood immunization rate is among the nation’s worst — ranking 43rd lowest among the 50 states for toddlers aged 19 to 35 months.
  • During the 2015-16 school year, Michigan had the 10th highest non-medical exemption rate in the nation, with 3.4 percent of parents simply choosing not to immunize their children.
  • In 2016, Michigan had 20 counties with a vaccine waiver rate of 5 percent or more among kindergartners.
  • Only 29 percent of Michigan teens ages 13 to 18 years are up to date on their vaccinations, according to data from MCIR from December 2016.

In Michigan, parents with school-age children have the option to sign a vaccination waiver for philosophical or religious reasons. As of 2015, parents who want a waiver for their child must attend an information session at their local health department. Areas with more vaccination waivers mean fewer children in the community are vaccinated and the community may not be protected by community immunity.

Content Source: https://ivaccinate.org/about-vaccines/vaccines-protect-everyone/

 

GYT: Get Yourself Tested
Posted on May 16, 2017

If you are sexually active, getting tested for STDs is one of the most important things you can do to protect your health. Make sure to have an open and honest conversation with your doctor about your sexual history and STD testing. A recent study found that one-third of teens didn’t talk about issues of sex and sexuality during their annual health visits.

If you are not comfortable talking with your regular health care provider about STDs, there are many clinics that provide confidential and free or low-cost testing. It is also important that you find and visit a doctor or other medical provider who stays current on STD and HIV testing recommendations.

Screening Recommendations

  • All adults and adolescents from ages 13 to 64 should be tested at least once for HIV.
  • Annual chlamydia and gonorrhea screening of all sexually active women younger than 25 years, as well as older women with risk factors such as new or multiple sex partners, or a sex partner who has a sexually transmitted infection.
  • Syphilis, HIV, chlamydia, and hepatitis B screening for all pregnant women, and gonorrhea screening for at-risk pregnant women starting early in pregnancy, with repeat testing as needed, to protect the health of mothers and their infants.
  • Screening at least once a year for syphilis, chlamydia, and gonorrhea for all sexually active gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM). MSM who have multiple or anonymous partners should be screened more frequently for STDs (i.e., at 3-to-6 month intervals).
  • Anyone who has unsafe sex or shares injection drug equipment should get tested for HIV at least once a year. Sexually active gay and bisexual men may benefit from more frequent testing (e.g., every 3 to 6 months).

Content Source: https://www.cdc.gov/std/sam/gyt.htm

Free Community Program for Persons Living with Diabetes
Posted on May 08, 2017

Marquette Mobile Food Pantry
Posted on April 12, 2017

Tuesday, April 18th 5:00 – 7:00 PM at the Salvation Army – Marquette

In partnership with Feeding America West Michigan, the Marquette Rotaract Club student group (NMU) will be coordinating a visit of a mobile food pantry to the area to help feed those in need within Marquette County. The truck will be filled with 15,000 pounds of produce, baked goods, and other assorted foods and will feed approximately 400 families. Anyone who is in need of assistance is welcome to come and take advantage of this free opportunity.

For more information contact: marquetterotaractclub@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

UPHP Minute – Episode 2 – HRA Incentive
Posted on February 17, 2017
UPHP Minute - Episode 2 - HRA Incentive

Episode 2: Healthy Michigan Plan HRA Incentive

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Delta County Family Events!
Posted on January 06, 2017

great-start-january-newsletter

Jan 7, 14, 21 & 28th

Escanaba Public Library Story hour  Saturdays at 1:30 pm FREE for children 4 years and older. No registration is required. Includes stories, crafts, and activities.

January 7th

18th Annual Tahquamenon Country Sled Dog Race in Newberry www.tcsdr.org

January 11th

Free Blood Sugar Screening Open to the community sponsored by OSF held at Northern Lights YMCA from 12:00 pm-2:00 pm. Call  906-789-0005 for more information.

January 13th

YMCA Winter Whirl 5:30 pm to 8:00 pm for grades K through 3. Dancing, contests, pizza and FUN during a cold winter night! $5 members/$8 general public. www.nlymca.com

January 17th

Child Find free developmental screenings for children 0-5 years old at the DSISD Call 906-786-9300 ext 201 to schedule an appointment

January 18th

Great Start Family Fun Night at the Escanaba Library: Winter is for the Birds! Bring your chick-a-dees out for a tweet night of fun. Space is limited. Registration required at www.123contactform.com/form-2396983/My- Form Families are encouraged to bring a gently used book to exchange to keep their libraries fresh!

January 19th

Delta County Great Start Parent Coalition Meeting 6:00 pm-7:30 pm at the Delta-Schoolcraft ISD. Help us brainstorm ideas and activities for family fun nights! The Parent Coalition is a great way to make a positive impact in your community. Please RSVP to Laurie Mold at 906-786-9300 ext 111 or lmold@dsisd.net with the number of adults and children attending.

January 19th – February 23rd

Chronic Pain Self-Management Program Thursdays 10:00 am-12:30 pm at MTEC Center,  Room 2018 is for anyone living with or caring for someone with any health problem that causes chronic, long-term pain.  Suggested donation of $20 to attend, includes class materials. Financial Assistance is available-contact UPCAP for Information. Space is limited! To register call UPCAP at 217-3019 or dial 2 – 1 – 1.

January 28th

Fayette Lantern Lit XC Ski/Snowshoe/Hike 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm at Fayette State Park in Garden. A 1.5 mi Bluff Trail will be lit with kerosene lanterns for an evening of snow fun. A warm bonfire marks the beginning and ending points. Marshmallows & hot chocolate behind park contact station. Dress warm and bring your own equipment. Call 906-644-2603 for more information.

January 31st

Hypnotist Fredrick Winters 7:00 pm at Bay

College Besse Center Theater.  $5 community members/$1 students. Prepared to be mystified! visit www.baycollege.edu for details.


winter-birdscheck-it-out  gift-of-reading

MSU-Extension Offers FREE Personal and Family Development Programming
Posted on December 07, 2016

msu-extension

The “Extension-Connection” Winter Schedule

Three Programs in One Afternoon

What:   Weekly Personal and Family Development Programming

ForAdults and families interested in improving their health and well-being

When:  Fridays

Where:  The Marquette County Health Department Basement Meeting Room

Time:   12:30-2:00 p.m.

3:00- 4:00 p.m.

4:00- 5:00 p.m.

CostFree!

There will be activities for young school aged children from 3:00 -5:00 p.m.

Register

Contact Tracie Abram, MSU Extension Educator at 906-235-2985 or abram@anr.msu.edu 

January/February 2017-   Curriculum:  Nurturing Families                                   12:30-2:00 p.m.

  • 1/6/17 – Philosophy and Practice of Nurturing
  • 1/13/17 – Learning Positive Ways to Deal with Stress and Anger and Alternatives to Spanking
  • 1/20/17 – Ages and Stages of Growth and Development and Enhancing Brain Development
  • 1/27/17 – Understanding Feelings and Communicating with Respect
  • 2/3/17 – Praising and Building Self Worth
  • 2/10/17 – Understanding and Developing Family Morals, Values, and Rules

January/February 2017- Eat Healthy Be Active:  Nutrition and Cooking ideas    3:00-4:00 p.m.

  • Each week from January 6, 2017 through February 10, 2017
  • Cooking demonstrations, activities and ideas for quick and easy meals

January/February 2017-  Curriculum:  Stress Less with Mindfulness*                    4:00-5:00 p.m.

  • 1/6/17- Mindfulness with Children
  • 1/13/17- Begin with Breath
  • 1/20/16 – Mindful Eating
  • 1/27/16- Mindful Walking and Thought Surfing
  • 2/3/17 – Be Kind to Your Mind
  • 2/10/17 – Power of laughter

*Fee for Stress Less with Mindfulness is $20 for all five sessions, or FREE with a certificate from DHHS.

 


What is Social-Emotional Health?

Social and emotional health encompasses:

  • forming and maintaining satisfying and healthy relationships
  • Taking another’s perspective
  • Resolving interpersonal conflict
  • Feeling capable and whole
  • Expressing emotions
  • Navigating stress
  • Having supportive relationships

Social and emotional health also involves:

  • Having a positive sense of self – including developing a healthy sense of identity around aspects related to race and ethnicity, gender, sexuality, spirituality and abilities/disabilities.

As is true for all aspects of human development, social and emotional health must be addressed and developed across multiple levels, including:

  • Personal
  • Interpersonal
  • Institutional
  • Cultural levels

MSU is an affirmative-action, equal-opportunity employer. Michigan State University Extension programs and materials are open to all without regard to race, color, national origin, gender, gender identity, religion, age, height, weight, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, marital status, family status or veteran status.